From humble roots, producing just 18 million board feet of lumber in 1954, today Seneca Sawmill currently includes three mills in Eugene and one at Noti, with production levels exceeding 650 million board feet. This accomplishment is through dedicated and proud teamwork, coupled with demand for excellence in every step of production.  Aided by the timber managed by Seneca Jones Timber Company and steam for dry kilns produced from the Seneca Sustainable Energy facility,  Seneca continues to be one of the largest-producing mills on one site in the United States.

 

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Latest News

Seneca Names Cameron Krauss as new Senior Vice President of Legal Affairs | June 30, 2016
New Hire Rounds Out the Next Generation of Leaders EUGENE, OR — Seneca Sawmill Company (Seneca) has hired Cameron Krauss as its new Senior Vice President of Legal Affairs. In this role, Krauss will oversee all legal and public policy matters for the Seneca Family of Companies. “Cameron is a seasoned leader with a solid Read More...

Seneca Has Complied on Taxes, Environment | June 27, 2016
Unfortunately, Mr. Wihtol’s reporting includes blatant half-truths and hyperbole that attempt to paint the Seneca power plant in a very unfavorable light. Read More...

Seneca Plants 36 Millionth Tree | March 24, 2016
Seneca Jones Timber Company just planted its 36,000,000th tree. Two of the three owners, Becky and Jody Jones, went out to their tree farm to celebrate the milestone and participate in a day of planting. Read More...

Rick Re Says Goodbye After 43 Years | March 22, 2016
Longtime lumberman Rick Re is resigning the last of his official duties at Seneca Sawmill Company. Re joined Seneca in 1973 and served the company in a wide range of capacities during his long and storied career. Read More...

Timberlands Reopened Following 2015 Fire Closures | September 25, 2015
While the 2015 fire season is not officially over, recent rains and cooler weather have reduced the danger enough for Seneca to reopen its timberlands in most areas Read More...